Are you ready for IR?


Joe Mcgloin
 

I've used infrared film for years from submini to 4x5", Color and B&W, slide and negative, Kodak and Rollei.  

Just like with regular film, I've had good results and bad -- mostly in between.

Here's some color results with a Minolta MG-s and different filters:

http://www.subclub.org/gallery/eir.htm

For submini cameras, the biggest roadblock is the IR filter -- but it's really just a speed bump.  For a B&W IR filter, I simply cut a small section from a 25A red & X11 green gelatin filters and stick them on a UV filter for the camera.

FYI, while B&W film is still easy to get, color is not -- but FFP has a limited supply in stock (35mm E-6).  It's not cheap, but when cut down to submini size it's not half-bad (Yuk,Yuk).  There's a link in the NEWSTAND section of the SUBCLUB.

Show us your results.


Godfrey DiGiorgi
 

I seem to recall that a piece of Ektachrome film, unexposed and processed, can make a reasonable 720nm IR-pass filter. I've used it to cover electronic flash unit tubes to use as IR flash triggers … It prevents the on-camera flash unit from exposing the subject but allows enough IR to pass to trigger other flashes in a remote flash setup.

I haven't shot IR film—B&W or color—for many, many years. What little IR I've done in the past decade or two has all been done with digital cameras… Some cameras are particularlly well suited to IR capture, and most digital cameras can be modified for ONLY IR pretty easily if you're so inclined. 

G


On May 7, 2021, at 6:56 AM, Joe Mcgloin via groups.io <xkaes@...> wrote:

I've used infrared film for years from submini to 4x5", Color and B&W, slide and negative, Kodak and Rollei.  

Just like with regular film, I've had good results and bad -- mostly in between.

Here's some color results with a Minolta MG-s and different filters:

http://www.subclub.org/gallery/eir.htm

For submini cameras, the biggest roadblock is the IR filter -- but it's really just a speed bump.  For a B&W IR filter, I simply cut a small section from a 25A red & X11 green gelatin filters and stick them on a UV filter for the camera.

FYI, while B&W film is still easy to get, color is not -- but FFP has a limited supply in stock (35mm E-6).  It's not cheap, but when cut down to submini size it's not half-bad (Yuk,Yuk).  There's a link in the NEWSTAND section of the SUBCLUB.

Show us your results.


Joe Mcgloin
 

I was under the (mistaken?) impression that most digital cameras are basically worthless for IR photography because they have built-in filters to remove IR light -- and while that filter can be removed, you better know what you're doing -- and the camera can only be used for IR work after removal.


Bill Watts
 

It is relatively straight forward to remove the IR and UV blocking filter from a digital camera and either replace it with a specific IR pass filter or plain glass. If you use plain glass then a IR pass filter is placed in front of the lens allowing the wavelength to be chosen at will. A combined IR and UV filter can also be fitted in front of the lens, reverting the camera to conventional photography. With no filter in front of the lens the camera responds to all wavelengths.

There are a number of companies that will do the mod for you if you don't feel up to doing it yourself.

Bill Watts, Singapore


From: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io> on behalf of Joe Mcgloin via groups.io <xkaes@...>
Sent: Friday, May 7, 2021 8:01:22 PM
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?
 
I was under the (mistaken?) impression that most digital cameras are basically worthless for IR photography because they have built-in filters to remove IR light -- and while that filter can be removed, you better know what you're doing -- and the camera can only be used for IR work after removal.


Harold Furr
 

I too have read that most digital cameras contain an IR-blocking filter.
However,  I have a Canon SX40 ('super-zoom,' not interchangeable lens camera) which does not have a filter to block IR. I have used it with an R-72 Infrared filter (>720nm) to enjoy infrared photography.  Long exposures are required, of course.
One could try a Wratten A (#25) filter but the effect would not be as intense.
-- Harold Furr

On Friday, May 7, 2021, 02:01:24 PM EDT, Joe Mcgloin via groups.io <xkaes@...> wrote:


I was under the (mistaken?) impression that most digital cameras are basically worthless for IR photography because they have built-in filters to remove IR light -- and while that filter can be removed, you better know what you're doing -- and the camera can only be used for IR work after removal.


Joe Mcgloin
 

I'm sorry I brought this up -- because I was referring to SUBMINI work -- but tearing apart many larger format cameras for IR work can cost a TON.




-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Watts <wilwahabri@...>
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, May 7, 2021 11:21 am
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?

It is relatively straight forward to remove the IR and UV blocking filter from a digital camera and either replace it with a specific IR pass filter or plain glass. If you use plain glass then a IR pass filter is placed in front of the lens allowing the wavelength to be chosen at will. A combined IR and UV filter can also be fitted in front of the lens, reverting the camera to conventional photography. With no filter in front of the lens the camera responds to all wavelengths.

There are a number of companies that will do the mod for you if you don't feel up to doing it yourself.

Bill Watts, Singapore


From: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io> on behalf of Joe Mcgloin via groups.io <xkaes@...>
Sent: Friday, May 7, 2021 8:01:22 PM
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?
 
I was under the (mistaken?) impression that most digital cameras are basically worthless for IR photography because they have built-in filters to remove IR light -- and while that filter can be removed, you better know what you're doing -- and the camera can only be used for IR work after removal.


Godfrey DiGiorgi
 

It depends on the camera. My old Sony F707 and F828 were very good for IR work, just needed an IR-pass filter. Since these cameras' sensors (5/8" format) were smaller than a Minolta-16 frame, I think they pass for "submini" if you want to stick to submini-sized formats. 
IR Sunset - Tokyo 2002
Sony DSC-F707 + Hoya #072 ir-pass filter

An unconventional IR photo… No foliage etc. 😉

G

On May 7, 2021, at 11:01 AM, Joe Mcgloin via groups.io <xkaes@...> wrote:

I was under the (mistaken?) impression that most digital cameras are basically worthless for IR photography because they have built-in filters to remove IR light -- and while that filter can be removed, you better know what you're doing -- and the camera can only be used for IR work after removal.


Cricket
 

Thats a fantastic shot G!!

On May 7, 2021, at 18:35, Godfrey DiGiorgi via groups.io <godfreydigiorgi@...> wrote:

It depends on the camera. My old Sony F707 and F828 were very good for IR work, just needed an IR-pass filter. Since these cameras' sensors (5/8" format) were smaller than a Minolta-16 frame, I think they pass for "submini" if you want to stick to submini-sized formats. 
<IR-Sunset-Tokyo-2002.jpg>
IR Sunset - Tokyo 2002
Sony DSC-F707 + Hoya #072 ir-pass filter

An unconventional IR photo… No foliage etc. 😉

G

On May 7, 2021, at 11:01 AM, Joe Mcgloin via groups.io <xkaes@...> wrote:

I was under the (mistaken?) impression that most digital cameras are basically worthless for IR photography because they have built-in filters to remove IR light -- and while that filter can be removed, you better know what you're doing -- and the camera can only be used for IR work after removal.



Joe Mcgloin
 

Not to quibble, but Minolta's two 16mm formats were smaller than 5/8".

Anyway, some digital cameras -- of whatever format.-- can be converted to IR.   

None as easily as a film camera -- all you need is IR film and a red filter.


-----Original Message-----
From: Godfrey DiGiorgi via groups.io <godfreydigiorgi@...>
To: Submini-L List <main@Submini-L.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, May 7, 2021 4:35 pm
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?

It depends on the camera. My old Sony F707 and F828 were very good for IR work, just needed an IR-pass filter. Since these cameras' sensors (5/8" format) were smaller than a Minolta-16 frame, I think they pass for "submini" if you want to stick to submini-sized formats. 
IR Sunset - Tokyo 2002
Sony DSC-F707 + Hoya #072 ir-pass filter

An unconventional IR photo… No foliage etc. 😉

G

On May 7, 2021, at 11:01 AM, Joe Mcgloin via groups.io <xkaes@...> wrote:

I was under the (mistaken?) impression that most digital cameras are basically worthless for IR photography because they have built-in filters to remove IR light -- and while that filter can be removed, you better know what you're doing -- and the camera can only be used for IR work after removal.


Donald Qualls
 

Okay, I'll quibble.  Sensor size, if a single figure is given, is diagonal measurement.  The later Minolta frame was 13x17 mm, giving a diagonal of 21.4 mm -- about .84 inches, or just short of 7/8", significantly more than 5/8" (which would be .625 or about 16mm).  The 110 frame is essentially the same, 12x18 giving 21.6 mm diagonal, the Kiev Vega II, 30, and 303 had the same frame as the later Minoltas.  Many other 16mm cameras had smaller 10x14 mm frames; those still give a diagonal of 17.2 mm, which is still bigger than 5/8".

Joe Mcgloin via groups.io wrote:

Not to quibble, but Minolta's two 16mm formats were smaller than 5/8".

--
If you can do something no one else in your office or shop can, that'll soon be all you're allowed to do.

Donald Qualls KX4QP, aka The Silent Observer SKCC #20267

Opinions expressed are my own unless otherwise noted.


Joe Mcgloin
 

You've got me there.

I was talking about Minolta's 16mm cameras -- not their 110 cameras.

And my point was that it was easy to convert my submini film cameras to IR use.

My digital "wonders"?  Not so much!  I mean Not at all!!!




-----Original Message-----
From: Donald Qualls <silent1@...>
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io
Sent: Fri, May 7, 2021 5:32 pm
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?

Okay, I'll quibble.  Sensor size, if a single figure is given, is
diagonal measurement.  The later Minolta frame was 13x17 mm, giving a
diagonal of 21.4 mm -- about .84 inches, or just short of 7/8",
significantly more than 5/8" (which would be .625 or about 16mm).  The
110 frame is essentially the same, 12x18 giving 21.6 mm diagonal, the
Kiev Vega II, 30, and 303 had the same frame as the later Minoltas. 
Many other 16mm cameras had smaller 10x14 mm frames; those still give a
diagonal of 17.2 mm, which is still bigger than 5/8".

Joe Mcgloin via groups.io wrote:
> Not to quibble, but Minolta's two 16mm formats were smaller than 5/8".
>
>

--
If you can do something no one else in your office or shop can, that'll soon be all you're allowed to do.

Donald Qualls KX4QP, aka The Silent Observer  SKCC #20267

Opinions expressed are my own unless otherwise noted.







Godfrey DiGiorgi
 

Actually, I was incorrect. The Sony F707 has a 2/3” sensor: 6.6x8.8mm.  .. smaller than a Minix 8x11. 

Godfrey DiGiorgi - godfreydigiorgi@... - 408-431-4601

On May 7, 2021, at 5:42 PM, Joe Mcgloin via groups.io <xkaes@...> wrote:


You've got me there.

I was talking about Minolta's 16mm cameras -- not their 110 cameras.

And my point was that it was easy to convert my submini film cameras to IR use.

My digital "wonders"?  Not so much!  I mean Not at all!!!




-----Original Message-----
From: Donald Qualls <silent1@...>
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io
Sent: Fri, May 7, 2021 5:32 pm
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?

Okay, I'll quibble.  Sensor size, if a single figure is given, is
diagonal measurement.  The later Minolta frame was 13x17 mm, giving a
diagonal of 21.4 mm -- about .84 inches, or just short of 7/8",
significantly more than 5/8" (which would be .625 or about 16mm).  The
110 frame is essentially the same, 12x18 giving 21.6 mm diagonal, the
Kiev Vega II, 30, and 303 had the same frame as the later Minoltas. 
Many other 16mm cameras had smaller 10x14 mm frames; those still give a
diagonal of 17.2 mm, which is still bigger than 5/8".

Joe Mcgloin via groups.io wrote:
> Not to quibble, but Minolta's two 16mm formats were smaller than 5/8".
>
>

--
If you can do something no one else in your office or shop can, that'll soon be all you're allowed to do.

Donald Qualls KX4QP, aka The Silent Observer  SKCC #20267

Opinions expressed are my own unless otherwise noted.







Murray Kelly
 

The digital cameras here can 'see' the TV remote IR flashes when you press the remote buttons. A handy trick to check the batteries.
Murray VK4AOK


Bill Watts
 

Bit of an OT digression, but for information only:-

Based on sensor size any digital camera with an APS-C or M4/3 sensor or smaller could be considered sub-miniature. M4/3 is the same size as a 110 frame, APS-C slightly larger but smaller than a 35mm frame.

Most digital cameras can record infra red images, even with the IR filter fitted. A very long exposure is required with an IR pass filter fitted in front of the lens. Some brands are more compatible than others.

Bill Watts, Singapore


From: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io> on behalf of Murray Kelly <kelly@...>
Sent: Saturday, May 8, 2021 6:05:17 AM
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?
 
The digital cameras here can 'see' the TV remote IR flashes when you press the remote buttons. A handy trick to check the batteries.
Murray VK4AOK






nigel richards
 

Hi,

I convert digital cameras to infrared and full spectrum, probably done 200….. mainly Panasonic compacts and micro 4/3, I always replace the IR Cut filter  (and AA filter) with an appropriate thickness of clear or IR Pass filter.  I find there is a lot of confusion about cameras and what filters are in front of the sensor, some manufacturers talk about no filter but what they often mean is the Anti Alias filter as that can now be done with software.  There is still a IR cut filter which is why if you put a IR pass filter on the lens you still get long exposures.    Leica M8 has no AA and a very weak IR cut filter and it got them into all sorts of problems when it came out.

You can see my own IR photographs at http://www.nigelrichards.org.uk/Infrared%20Images.htm  many are taken with very small sensor compact cameras which by some definitions make them Sub miniature.

My main camera collect is Sub miniature with about 450 cameras!

Cheers

Nigel

www.nigelrichardsphotography.co.uk

 

 

 

 

From: main@Submini-L.groups.io [mailto:main@Submini-L.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill Watts
Sent: 08 May 2021 08:19
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?

 

Bit of an OT digression, but for information only:-

Based on sensor size any digital camera with an APS-C or M4/3 sensor or smaller could be considered sub-miniature. M4/3 is the same size as a 110 frame, APS-C slightly larger but smaller than a 35mm frame.

Most digital cameras can record infra red images, even with the IR filter fitted. A very long exposure is required with an IR pass filter fitted in front of the lens. Some brands are more compatible than others.

Bill Watts, Singapore

 


From: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io> on behalf of Murray Kelly <kelly@...>
Sent: Saturday, May 8, 2021 6:05:17 AM
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?

 

The digital cameras here can 'see' the TV remote IR flashes when you press the remote buttons. A handy trick to check the batteries.
Murray VK4AOK





Joe Mcgloin
 

I'll try out my Konica Minolta A2 digital which has a very small sensor -- and a ton of features -- but I expect IR images to be impossible.  It has a built in IR filter (not what we usually think -- this IR filter cuts OUT IR light), and by adding a typical IR filter (which cuts out everything except IR light) will give nothing to the sensor.

As to my Konica Minolta A2 being a "submini"?  I suppose in some sense.  It's a very nice camera, but it's up there in size with the Hendren Octopus "The Weekender" when compared to conventional subminis.

For IR work?  I think I'll stick to my Minolta MG-s.



-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Watts <wilwahabri@...>
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io>
Sent: Sat, May 8, 2021 12:18 am
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?

Bit of an OT digression, but for information only:-

Based on sensor size any digital camera with an APS-C or M4/3 sensor or smaller could be considered sub-miniature. M4/3 is the same size as a 110 frame, APS-C slightly larger but smaller than a 35mm frame.

Most digital cameras can record infra red images, even with the IR filter fitted. A very long exposure is required with an IR pass filter fitted in front of the lens. Some brands are more compatible than others.

Bill Watts, Singapore


From: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io> on behalf of Murray Kelly <kelly@...>
Sent: Saturday, May 8, 2021 6:05:17 AM
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?
 
The digital cameras here can 'see' the TV remote IR flashes when you press the remote buttons. A handy trick to check the batteries.
Murray VK4AOK






Joe Mcgloin
 

Best of luck with converting digital cameras.

All a submini film camera needs is IR film and an IR filter -- pretty simple, easy & cheap -- or with my MG-s a red & green filter.

-----Original Message-----
From: nigel richards <nrexfreeserve@...>
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io
Sent: Sat, May 8, 2021 4:51 am
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?

Hi,
I convert digital cameras to infrared and full spectrum, probably done 200….. mainly Panasonic compacts and micro 4/3, I always replace the IR Cut filter  (and AA filter) with an appropriate thickness of clear or IR Pass filter.  I find there is a lot of confusion about cameras and what filters are in front of the sensor, some manufacturers talk about no filter but what they often mean is the Anti Alias filter as that can now be done with software.  There is still a IR cut filter which is why if you put a IR pass filter on the lens you still get long exposures.    Leica M8 has no AA and a very weak IR cut filter and it got them into all sorts of problems when it came out.
You can see my own IR photographs at http://www.nigelrichards.org.uk/Infrared%20Images.htm  many are taken with very small sensor compact cameras which by some definitions make them Sub miniature.
My main camera collect is Sub miniature with about 450 cameras!
Cheers
Nigel
 
 
 
 
From: main@Submini-L.groups.io [mailto:main@Submini-L.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill Watts
Sent: 08 May 2021 08:19
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?
 
Bit of an OT digression, but for information only:-
Based on sensor size any digital camera with an APS-C or M4/3 sensor or smaller could be considered sub-miniature. M4/3 is the same size as a 110 frame, APS-C slightly larger but smaller than a 35mm frame.
Most digital cameras can record infra red images, even with the IR filter fitted. A very long exposure is required with an IR pass filter fitted in front of the lens. Some brands are more compatible than others.
Bill Watts, Singapore
 

From: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io> on behalf of Murray Kelly <kelly@...>
Sent: Saturday, May 8, 2021 6:05:17 AM
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?
 
The digital cameras here can 'see' the TV remote IR flashes when you press the remote buttons. A handy trick to check the batteries.
Murray VK4AOK





nigel richards
 

You will probably get something, yes most digital cameras have an IR cut filter in front of the sensor however when you put an IR pass filter in front of the lens enough IR light leaks through to give you an image but you may need a 30 second exposure. I started shooting digital IR with an unconverted Canon 5d in 2005 great results on a tripod, but soon realised that I needed to work out how to convert cameras properly.

 

From: main@Submini-L.groups.io [mailto:main@Submini-L.groups.io] On Behalf Of Joe Mcgloin via groups.io
Sent: 08 May 2021 13:14
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?

 

I'll try out my Konica Minolta A2 digital which has a very small sensor -- and a ton of features -- but I expect IR images to be impossible.  It has a built in IR filter (not what we usually think -- this IR filter cuts OUT IR light), and by adding a typical IR filter (which cuts out everything except IR light) will give nothing to the sensor.

 

As to my Konica Minolta A2 being a "submini"?  I suppose in some sense.  It's a very nice camera, but it's up there in size with the Hendren Octopus "The Weekender" when compared to conventional subminis.

 

For IR work?  I think I'll stick to my Minolta MG-s.

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Watts <wilwahabri@...>
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io>
Sent: Sat, May 8, 2021 12:18 am
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?

Bit of an OT digression, but for information only:-

Based on sensor size any digital camera with an APS-C or M4/3 sensor or smaller could be considered sub-miniature. M4/3 is the same size as a 110 frame, APS-C slightly larger but smaller than a 35mm frame.

Most digital cameras can record infra red images, even with the IR filter fitted. A very long exposure is required with an IR pass filter fitted in front of the lens. Some brands are more compatible than others.

Bill Watts, Singapore

 


From: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io> on behalf of Murray Kelly <kelly@...>
Sent: Saturday, May 8, 2021 6:05:17 AM
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?

 

The digital cameras here can 'see' the TV remote IR flashes when you press the remote buttons. A handy trick to check the batteries.
Murray VK4AOK





Jim Brokaw
 

There are a lot of older digital cameras out and about that can be had for very low cost (or even free). Anyone with a few small tools and reasonable handiness might try to convert one for IR by removing the IR-blocking glass from in front of the sensor, and replacing it with a flat plain clear glass of similar thickness. There are guides and videos online showing how to do this for some common (big-seller) cameras. I’ve picked up a couple old Canon digital Rebels, the first 6MP version, intending to try this someday. You can even buy pre-cut flat glass pieces on eBay or from those with the web guides. Some of those people will also do it for you for a fee. Based on the online pages I’ve viewed, the results can be intriguing and excellent.

Jim Brokaw

On May 8, 2021, at 4:18 PM, nigel richards <nrexfreeserve@...> wrote:

You will probably get something, yes most digital cameras have an IR cut filter in front of the sensor however when you put an IR pass filter in front of the lens enough IR light leaks through to give you an image but you may need a 30 second exposure. I started shooting digital IR with an unconverted Canon 5d in 2005 great results on a tripod, but soon realised that I needed to work out how to convert cameras properly. 
 
From: main@Submini-L.groups.io [mailto:main@Submini-L.groups.io] On Behalf Of Joe Mcgloin via groups.io
Sent: 08 May 2021 13:14
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?
 
I'll try out my Konica Minolta A2 digital which has a very small sensor -- and a ton of features -- but I expect IR images to be impossible.  It has a built in IR filter (not what we usually think -- this IR filter cuts OUT IR light), and by adding a typical IR filter (which cuts out everything except IR light) will give nothing to the sensor. 
 
As to my Konica Minolta A2 being a "submini"?  I suppose in some sense.  It's a very nice camera, but it's up there in size with the Hendren Octopus "The Weekender" when compared to conventional subminis.
 
For IR work?  I think I'll stick to my Minolta MG-s.
 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Watts <wilwahabri@...>
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io>
Sent: Sat, May 8, 2021 12:18 am
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?

Bit of an OT digression, but for information only:-

Based on sensor size any digital camera with an APS-C or M4/3 sensor or smaller could be considered sub-miniature. M4/3 is the same size as a 110 frame, APS-C slightly larger but smaller than a 35mm frame.

Most digital cameras can record infra red images, even with the IR filter fitted. A very long exposure is required with an IR pass filter fitted in front of the lens. Some brands are more compatible than others. 

Bill Watts, Singapore
 

From: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io> on behalf of Murray Kelly <kelly@...>
Sent: Saturday, May 8, 2021 6:05:17 AM
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?
 

The digital cameras here can 'see' the TV remote IR flashes when you press the remote buttons. A handy trick to check the batteries.
Murray VK4AOK






Joe Mcgloin
 

Thanks for the info.  

It sounds like something, some of us, might want to consider -- in the after-life, or after a few beers!

Right, now, I've got enough to do.  


-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Brokaw <jbrokaw@...>
To: main@submini-l.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io>
Sent: Sat, May 8, 2021 5:12 pm
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?

There are a lot of older digital cameras out and about that can be had for very low cost (or even free). Anyone with a few small tools and reasonable handiness might try to convert one for IR by removing the IR-blocking glass from in front of the sensor, and replacing it with a flat plain clear glass of similar thickness. There are guides and videos online showing how to do this for some common (big-seller) cameras. I’ve picked up a couple old Canon digital Rebels, the first 6MP version, intending to try this someday. You can even buy pre-cut flat glass pieces on eBay or from those with the web guides. Some of those people will also do it for you for a fee. Based on the online pages I’ve viewed, the results can be intriguing and excellent.

Jim Brokaw

On May 8, 2021, at 4:18 PM, nigel richards <nrexfreeserve@...> wrote:

You will probably get something, yes most digital cameras have an IR cut filter in front of the sensor however when you put an IR pass filter in front of the lens enough IR light leaks through to give you an image but you may need a 30 second exposure. I started shooting digital IR with an unconverted Canon 5d in 2005 great results on a tripod, but soon realised that I needed to work out how to convert cameras properly. 
 
From: main@Submini-L.groups.io [mailto:main@Submini-L.groups.io] On Behalf Of Joe Mcgloin via groups.io
Sent: 08 May 2021 13:14
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?
 
I'll try out my Konica Minolta A2 digital which has a very small sensor -- and a ton of features -- but I expect IR images to be impossible.  It has a built in IR filter (not what we usually think -- this IR filter cuts OUT IR light), and by adding a typical IR filter (which cuts out everything except IR light) will give nothing to the sensor. 
 
As to my Konica Minolta A2 being a "submini"?  I suppose in some sense.  It's a very nice camera, but it's up there in size with the Hendren Octopus "The Weekender" when compared to conventional subminis.
 
For IR work?  I think I'll stick to my Minolta MG-s.
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Watts <wilwahabri@...>
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io>
Sent: Sat, May 8, 2021 12:18 am
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?
Bit of an OT digression, but for information only:-
Based on sensor size any digital camera with an APS-C or M4/3 sensor or smaller could be considered sub-miniature. M4/3 is the same size as a 110 frame, APS-C slightly larger but smaller than a 35mm frame.
Most digital cameras can record infra red images, even with the IR filter fitted. A very long exposure is required with an IR pass filter fitted in front of the lens. Some brands are more compatible than others. 
Bill Watts, Singapore
 

From: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io> on behalf of Murray Kelly <kelly@...>
Sent: Saturday, May 8, 2021 6:05:17 AM
To: main@Submini-L.groups.io <main@Submini-L.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Submini-L] Are you ready for IR?
 
The digital cameras here can 'see' the TV remote IR flashes when you press the remote buttons. A handy trick to check the batteries.
Murray VK4AOK