3D Printed Paterson Minox Reel


Terry Martin
 

Hi All,
My local library finished a couple 3D printing projects for me an I
can now give a preliminary, thumbs-up, report on the 3D printed Minox
reel for Paterson tanks. See:
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4831142
The pros:
a. I was able to feed a full 56 inch length of 9.2mm film strip into
the reel with no difficulty whatsoever. That went very smoothly in a
dry reel. Just like Thin's reels.
b. The parts, once adjusted, went together well. I glued them with
a J&B cryano-acrylic type gel once assembled.
c. The cost of printing materials was quite low, probably under US$5.
d. The inner reel diameter fit the Yankee Clipper II tanks I have,
and likely others in addition to the Paterson it was designed for (I
no longer have a Paterson tank).
e. The reel's outer diameter will likely fit into the many steel
tanks available.
The cons (is life perfect anywhere?):
a. There were little bumps on the interior circumference of the inner
reel portion and the exterior circumference of the outer reel portion
(of the central cylinder).
b. The inner reel diameter DID NOT fit the Yankee Master tanks I
have, a bummer for me as I really like my Master tanks. Just a
smidgen larger and Bob's your uncle, it would fit nicely.
c. The reels are fixed with respect to one another, denying
counter-rotation feed of film into the grooves.
In summary:
I'm going to order at least one more!
Regards/73
Terry
--
Terrence (Terry) Martin
Registered Patent Attorney
WD4AON@gmail.com

"The large print giveth, the small print taketh away"


Michael Fowler
 

Your welcome -  FYI - This is for the Nikor Stainless steel Tanks - NOT Patterson or Yankee. (as stated in the description) 

73 - N7XBJ


Not Available
 

This is interesting and good to hear.  I've seen various cautions against using 3D printed plastic for stuff that contacts food, since it can leach out chemicals, so I'd also have some concern about that getting into the film developing solution.  If the film still develops ok though, then great--at most perhaps the film's archival permanence might get degraded.  But if you scan the negs not too long afterwards, maybe that is less of a concern now than in the old days since it's easier to preserve and back up digital copies.


Dennis Boone
 

I've seen various cautions against using 3D printed plastic for stuff
> that contacts food, since it can leach out chemicals, so I'd also
> have some concern about that getting into the film developing
> solution.

If you can print the thing with PET-G, I don't think you would have a
problem with leaching. It's fairly inert stuff, resistant to many
chemicals.

(PET-G is also widely used in plastic food packaging, though most
filament probably isn't food-grade.)

De